History on the River

If you're walking on Elliott Way, south of the Yacht Club, you’ll see some red bricks scattered among the rip rap along the shore. These all appear to be what were called Croton Point bricks, made at the William A. Underhill Brickyard on the northern end of the point. Some Underhill bricks were stamped with … Continue reading History on the River

Croton Landing, 1872

Here is a detailed map of what Croton looked like 142 years ago. Known then as Croton Landing, the village consisted mainly of houses and businesses along what we know today as Grand Street, Brook Street, and Riverside Avenue. If you look at the top left side you can see that Riverside Avenue got its … Continue reading Croton Landing, 1872

History Underfoot

While visiting a home in the Harmon area the owners proudly pointed out the Croton Point bricks used in the floor of what had originally been a large covered porch. Well-worn from more than a century of use, many are stamped with the initials of William A. Underhill, who used the clay deposits to make … Continue reading History Underfoot

View of Haverstraw Bay, circa 1868

At first glance you might think this beautiful print is an etching made by a Hudson River painter—looking north from Scarborough, showing a sweeping, placid panorama of the widest section of the river, stretching from Rockland Lake to the mouth of the Croton. The artist has depicted a sailboat in the foreground—representing the romantic, natural … Continue reading View of Haverstraw Bay, circa 1868

Croton Point, 1898

This fascinating map of "Teller's Point or Croton Point" was drawn by Edward Hagaman Hall for an article published in the March, 1898 issue of the magazine The Spirit of '76. In addition to recording the roads and buildings, Hall provided a numbered key (see below) to points of historic interest. Edward Hagaman Hall was … Continue reading Croton Point, 1898

W.E. Tallcot & Co. Brickmaking Machine, 1884

A diagram of a brickmaking machine manufactured by W.E. Tallcot & Co. at Croton Landing in the late 1800s. This image and the ad below are from A Practical Treatise on the Manufacture of Bricks . . . by Charles Thomas Davis, published in 1884.

Anchor Brand Bricks at Croton Landing, 1889

"No Overburnt Brick" An ad from the Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide, July 6, 1889.  

The U.S. Brick & Enameling Company at Croton Point, 1884

An ad for the United States Brick & Enameling Company at Croton Point, from Real Estate Record and Builders' Guide (v. 34, no. 851: July 5, 1884)