Croton’s First Train Station

Croton's first train station, circa 1849-1850.

Croton’s first train station, circa 1849.

Croton filmmaker, journalist and history-buff Ken Sargeant has shared with us a disk of images he acquired many years ago when he was doing some work with the late Roberta Arminio at the the Ossining Historical Society. Ms. Arminio was a long-time director of the OHS, as well as the Ossining town and village historian.

We’ve selected a few rare 19th century images of Croton from Ken’s cache and are pleased to present the first in the series, courtesy of the Ossining Historical Society.

Croton’s First Train Station, circa 1849

This is a very early photograph—possibly the earliest—of the first train station in what was then called Croton Landing. The station was built in 1849 and was located on the river side of the tracks, across from the intersection of today’s North Riverside Avenue and Grand Street (then called River Street and Lower Landing Road, respectively).

There is a different photograph of this station in the Croton Historical Society’s Images of America book—which you can order here or purchase at the CHS office in the Municipal Building—but it was taken from the opposite side of the building and appears to be a later image.

What’s significant about this photograph is that it shows the shore of the Hudson River before it was greatly extended with landfill and also nicely juxtaposes the old and new modes of transportation.

Below is a detail of the area from a map of the property of Phillip G. Van Wyck.1 The map helps approximate the age of the photo because it shows landfill and buildings on the river side of the station which don’t appear in the photograph. The map is dated 1850, making it likely that the photograph dates from 1849, the year the station was constructed.

Detail from an 1850 map of the property of Phillip G. Van Wyck in Croton. The road on the right is today's Grand Street, then called Lower Landing Road.

Detail from an 1850 map of the property of Phillip G. Van Wyck in Croton.
The road on the right is today’s Grand Street, then called Lower Landing Road.

Coming next: A photograph of the ornamental wooden arch and gate that once greeted worshippers and mourners visiting Bethel Cemetery.


  1. For more on the Van Wyck map, see this previous post.

Croton Landing, 1872

Croton Landing from plate 44 of the County Atlas Of Westchester New York, published by J.B. Beers & Co., 1872. Click the image to enlarge it.

Croton Landing from plate 44 of the County Atlas Of Westchester New York, published by J.B. Beers & Co., 1872. Click the image to enlarge it.

Here is a detailed map of what Croton looked like 142 years ago. Known then as Croton Landing, the village consisted mainly of houses and businesses along what we know today as Grand Street, Brook Street, and Riverside Avenue.

If you look at the top left side you can see that Riverside Avenue got its name because it did once run right along the side of the Hudson River. That area to the right of the railroad tracks was filled in long ago, altering the original banks of the river. The pond-like area at the bottom left between the tracks and Riverside—which is probably the depressed area where the farmer’s market is held today—was also filled in.

Other interesting features include:

  • The brook along Brook Street, now covered over.1
  • In the top right the label “Friends Ch.” is the Quaker Meeting House which was located at the intersection of Grand Street and Mt. Airy.2
  • The house labeled “Mrs. Barton” in the triangular area bounded by Old Post North, Brook Street, and Terrace Place still exists today and is said to be the oldest house in Croton.

The entire map and the rest of this 1872 Westchester County atlas can be seen at the David Rumsey Map Collection.


  1. Although not labeled on this map, Brook Street was then called Upper Landing Road.
  2. See this previous post for an 1850 map showing the Quaker Meeting House in more detail.

Croton Area in 1886

Colton-1886

Detail of the Croton area from Colton’s Map of the County of Westchester. Drawn, Engraved and Published by G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co. 182 William St. New York. 1886.

The entire map is available online at David Rumsey Map Collection.

Croton Area in 1848

Harper-1830-detail

Detail of the Croton area from the Travellers’ Guide of the Hudson River. Published by H.B. Kirkham, for the Proprietor, and for sale on all the Steamboats, and at the principal Hotels in the United States, 1848.

The entire map is available online at David Rumsey Map Collection.

Croton Area in 1830

Kirkum-1848-detail

Details of the Croton area from An Improved Map of the Hudson River, with the Post Roads between N. York & Albany. Published by S. Mahon & Co. Drawn & Engraved Expressly for the Tourist. 1830.

The entire map is available online at David Rumsey Map Collection.

Kirkum-1848-detail-croton

Croton Landing, 1881

Croton-landing-detail-bromley-1881

Detail from the Atlas of Westchester County, New York. From actual surveys and official records by G.W. Bromley & Co., Civil Engineers. Published by Geo. W. & Walter S. Bromley. 243 Broadway, New York. 1881.

The entire atlas is available online at David Rumsey.

W.E. Tallcot & Co. Brickmaking Machine, 1884

Talcott

A diagram of a brickmaking machine manufactured by W.E. Tallcot & Co. at Croton Landing in the late 1800s.

This image and the ad below are from A Practical Treatise on the Manufacture of Bricks . . . by Charles Thomas Davis, published in 1884.

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